How come I can Jump, cough, sneeze and pee at the same time?

Physical Therapy for Stress Incontinence – In Women around Brockton, MA

What is Urinary Incontinence? A “Leaky Bladder”

Urinary incontinence is the involuntary leakage of urine. 25 million Americans experience this condition, and ¼ of women between the ages of 18 and 59 have urinary incontinence. There are different types of incontinence, with the most common being stress and urge incontinence.

  1. Stress incontinence is when leakage happens during coughing, sneezing, or laughing.
  2. Urge incontinence is a result of the bladder being overactive or unstable. People with urge incontinence often have triggers that cause the involuntary loss of urine, such as hearing running water.

What can be done?

Physical therapy can be used to effectively treat urinary incontinence. A typical program consists of a combination of exercise and education. Exercise is used to improve the strength of the muscles of the pelvic floor, providing better support to the bladder and improving your ability to control the flow of urine. Education helps you learn how the bladder normally functions and what changes you can make to improve your symptoms. Examples of these changes include making sure that you are adequately hydrated, avoiding “just in case” peeing, and dietary changes to avoid bladder irritants like spicy foods, citrus fruits, caffeine, and carbonated beverages.

A common example of a pelvic floor strengthening exercise is the Kegel. Although this exercise is well-known and commonly attempted, it is frequently done incorrectly. Many people substitute muscles that are not part of the pelvic floor during a Kegel like the abdominals, glutes, or hip adductors.

How to perform a correct Kegel:

  1. Avoid contracting your abdominals or glutes
  2. Tighten the muscles as if you’re trying to stop the flow of urine
  3. Then imagine a string pulling those muscles up towards your belly button.

National Physical therapy has experts in Fall River and Brockton, MA that can help you take back control of your bladder, so you can stop worrying about where the next restroom is. If you’re experiencing urinary incontinence, a pelvic PT at National Physical Therapy can provide a comprehensive evaluation and develop a treatment plan specifically for you!

Anonymous Zoom Lecture Series

PS Ladies…

Pelvic Floor Strengthening for Women

“Don’t let it take you out of the workout.”

  • DOES YOUR BLADDER LIMIT YOUR WORK OUT ?  DOES THE FEAR OF A LEAKY BLADDER HALT YOUR ABILITY TO PERFORM DEEP SQUATS, BURPEES OR OTHER STRAINING OR JUMPING EXERCISES?
  • DID YOU KNOW A STRESS INCONTINENCE IS A WEAKNESS PROBLEM THAT CAN BE OFTEN CORRECTED WITH STRENGTHENING EXERCISES TAUGHT PROPERLY BY A PHYSICAL THERAPIST PROFESSIONAL THAT SPECIALIZES IN PELVIC FLOOR HEALTH.?
  • YOUR FOCUS AT THE GYM IS TO STRENGTHENING YOUR MUSCLES, LET US HELP TEACH YOU HOW TO STRENGTH YOUR PELVIC FLOOR.
  • FOCUS YOUR CONCENTRATION ON THE WORKOUTS NOT WHEN YOU NEED TO USE THE BATHROOM DURING THEM.
  • MANY WOMEN ARE EMBARRASSED BY THIS COMMON PROBLEM.

JOIN US ON ZOOM WHERE YOU CAN REMAIN ANONYMOUS AND PARTICIPATE IN A PELVIC FLOOR TRAINING SESSION FOR ONLY $40 DOLLARS.

DURING THIS SESSION YOU WILL LEARN EXERCISES TO ADDRESS THIS COMMON ISSUE. YOU MAY ASK THE HEALTH PROFESSIONAL QUESTIONS OR CONCERNS YOU MAY HAVE.

ENJOY JUMPING, SQUATTING, COUGHING AND SNEEZING AGAIN WITHOUT THE LEAK.

Call us or Text us at 781-767-5200 to learn more.

THE RESEARCH BEHIND IT.

Estimates are that 25% to 50% of women in the United States experience stress urinary incontinence (SUI).

Using traditional muscle and soft tissue assessment and special techniques, physical therapists evaluate the pelvic floor muscles and develop treatment strategies to help women return to their activities. The focus is on a comprehensive approach, with a combination of exercise, behavioral, and education interventions.

Stress incontinence is reported by women of all ages. This type of UI can have a significant impact on physical activity and general mobility.

Changes in incontinence outcomes may be seen as early as 1 week or not for several months; however, improvements in PFM strength may require at least 3 months of strength training

Females that participate in activities involving jumping, forceful landings, or use of combined abdominal and pelvic floor muscles increased severity of urine leakage. Women with SUI that participate in Cross Fit reported increased severity of urine leakage with box jumps and jumping rope, particularly with “double-unders”, in which the rope passes under the feet twice during the jump, highlighting worsening of symptoms with sustained pelvic pressure. A study showed women with urinary leakage during physical activity reported that exercises involving skipping, trampoline, jumping jacks and running most commonly caused leakage. But burpees, squats, and sit-ups caused greater severity of leakage. Even adolescent athletes endorsed that certain physical activities were more likely to cause SUI. Among high school girls of soccer, track, or field hockey teams who reported having SUI, 35% reported leakage with running, 36% reported leakage with heavy exertion, and 21% reported leakage with jumping.

A major limitation in the success of pelvic floor physical therapy is the ability to perform exercises accurately, which is often limited by a variety of factors including activity level and flexibility. Our therapist will show participants how to perform pelvic muscle training in a variety of positions, including standing, supine and during movement in order to maximize the effect on the pelvic floor.